The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

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filmyfan
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2007 9:50 am

Re: The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

#301 Post by filmyfan » Sat Dec 29, 2018 3:53 pm

Got my free digital download delivered today..after giving some money to complete the project over 3 years ago..

I have to admit I forgot about it!

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MichaelB
Joined: Fri Aug 11, 2006 6:20 pm
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Re: The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

#302 Post by MichaelB » Sun Dec 30, 2018 11:01 am

That reminds me: I’m still owed a set of Jan Švankmajer Blu-rays for investing in his last film way back when. But I assumed at the time that “late 2018” translated to “any time in 2019”, as that’s usually the case.

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The Elegant Dandy Fop
Joined: Thu Dec 09, 2004 3:25 am
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

#303 Post by The Elegant Dandy Fop » Sun Dec 30, 2018 3:17 pm

How does the digital download look? Netflix has real shitty encoding (understandably for speed reasons), and seeing a film shot in various film formats and colors, I'd occasionally encounter incredibly annoying macroblocking. I've also been secretly holding off on re-watching this film as I'm holding out hope that it plays on 35mm in Los Angeles soon.

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filmyfan
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2007 9:50 am

Re: The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

#304 Post by filmyfan » Sun Dec 30, 2018 4:00 pm

The Elegant Dandy Fop wrote:
Sun Dec 30, 2018 3:17 pm
How does the digital download look? Netflix has real shitty encoding (understandably for speed reasons), and seeing a film shot in various film formats and colors, I'd occasionally encounter incredibly annoying macroblocking. I've also been secretly holding off on re-watching this film as I'm holding out hope that it plays on 35mm in Los Angeles soon.
I will let you know when I have downloaded it..may be a few days/week or so yet (due to work commitments!).

I was hoping to catch the screening in London as well..but again due to work the screening times didn't suit.

JPJ
Joined: Mon Dec 15, 2008 8:23 am

Re: The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

#305 Post by JPJ » Wed Feb 06, 2019 12:35 am

If anyone is still interested in cd's,La-La Land records just released Michel Legrand's score.

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Red Screamer
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Re: The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

#306 Post by Red Screamer » Fri Oct 23, 2020 1:25 pm

Alex Ross Perry on Hopper/Welles. I hadn't heard this take on the footage before:
Alex Ross Perry wrote:If anybody ought to be credited as the author of this newly resurfaced footage, aside from Filip Jan Rymsza and Bob Murawski, who assembled it in the present, it might as well be Jake Hannaford, the character played on camera by John Huston in The Other Side of the Wind (2018), and off camera here by Welles.

...The realization that Hopper is being, at times, aggressively forced to address his beliefs in the power of movies, by a fictional character, comes slowly; you can watch it begin to wear off when, after about an hour, Hopper no longer treats this as an interview and starts referring to Hannaford by name, knowing full well that arguing with the film’s main character would provide better material than continuing to parse The Last Movie in highly specific detail.
At the time, I don't remember any reviews mentioning that, in The Other Side of the Wind you can hear Welles' voice offscreen, doing one of the faux-interviews. That always struck me as a wonderfully weird moment.

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The Elegant Dandy Fop
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Re: The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

#307 Post by The Elegant Dandy Fop » Fri Oct 23, 2020 2:55 pm

Is it possible to give Hopper/Welles its own individual thread?

One of the simultaneously frustrating and exciting parts of Orson Welles' career as an independent filmmaker is all the odds and ends of his career. There's The Merchant of Venice, where Shylock's monologue is missing, The Deep, with its incomplete ending, and even The Other Side of the Wind, which in its current state exists as a version of the film and even in all its brilliance, will never be Welles vision as Welles' use and understanding of editing was unlike anything of his era.

Existing as sort of a companion to The Other Side of the Wind, Hopper/Welles might only exist for the Venn diagram that has Welles fanatics on one side and Dennis Hopper (but specifically The Last Movie) fans on the other. And I happen to love both. For the Welles obsessives, it's very different than The Orson Welles Show where Welles and his tremendous physique and personality carry the entire program while playing into the silliness of the talk show format. He casually slips between Orson Welles the real person with his occasionally bawdy humor, brilliant observations, and love of art. He's also filling in for TOSOTW's Jack Hannaford, with philosophical and political beliefs that are absolutely contradictory to Welles himself. And Welles seems to have trouble sometimes defining which character he as he gets absorbed into the conversation with Hopper.

If Welles is playing Jack Hannaford, then Dennis Hopper is playing "Dennis Hopper", partially the artist stuck between the enormous success of Easy Rider and the soon to be tremendous flop of The Last Movie. If The American Dreamer plays into Hopper as a sort of symbol and end of the sixties as he dissolves into hedonism (lots of drugs, lots of sex), this sort of pre-sages it as Hopper is far more subdued here and even expresses skepticism about his importance as a symbol of youth and the new Hollywood. But Hopper is always playing the part of Dennis Hopper, probably in part due to the circumstances of the production and that this was never meant to be released as a film, but was meant to be excerpted in a larger picture. Welles wants the personality of Hopper on screen and asks the questions to encourage it.

If Welles as a director and editor in F for Fake proved his brilliance as a filmmaker that embraced chance and a sort of improvisational quality behind his Movieola and the curious camera of Gary Graver, then this gives him a moment to show off as a brilliant improvisatory actor too. Maybe it's connected to the fact that Welles was a marvelous raconteur, but the quickness of his retorts and the sorts of questions he asks really props and pokes Hopper into giving some pretty brilliant insight.

I always had an appreciation for Gary Graver being so quick on his feet to keep up with the demands and last minute inspirations of Welles' late-period, that I've even gone through some of his filmography as a b-movie cinematographer (a frequent collaborator to Curtis Harrington) and even his pornographic work (Indencent Exposure being recently released by Vinegar Syndrome). But this sort of gave me an appreciation for the beauty of his compositions that I never considered before. No wonder Welles fell in love with Graver! He manages to make a two-plus-hour conversation constantly interesting to look at as he plays with limited lights, placement, and a real documentary sense of filming.

I'm not sure if Welles can be considered the "director" here as it seems to maybe be closer to the recent phenomenon of documentaries made completely around found footage, but there's no denying that as the voice of God off screen, his fingerprint and presence is all over every single moment.

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Roger Ryan
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:04 pm
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Re: The Other Side of the Wind (Orson Welles, 2018)

#308 Post by Roger Ryan » Mon Oct 26, 2020 12:31 pm

Red Screamer wrote:
Fri Oct 23, 2020 1:25 pm
… At the time, I don't remember any reviews mentioning that, in The Other Side of the Wind you can hear Welles' voice offscreen, doing one of the faux-interviews. That always struck me as a wonderfully weird moment.
I believe there may have been a review or two that offer the caveat that, while Welles did not visibly appear in the film, his voice is heard as an interviewer (the one asking Lili Palmer's character Zarah Valeska questions before Jake Hannaford enters the room). While it's possible Welles would have replaced his own voice here in post-production, he's definitely asking the questions as a character so it works fine.

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