On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

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felipe
Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 11:06 pm

Re: On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

#26 Post by felipe » Mon Oct 26, 2020 11:40 am

It feels like a movie that could've been made by... anyone. An OK indie movie that nobody would be talking about if it didn't have Coppola's name attached to it.

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domino harvey
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Re: On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

#27 Post by domino harvey » Sun Nov 01, 2020 7:48 pm

This movie was an embarrassment. No dramatic stakes or meaningful complications whatsoever. Those two sentences are more discussion than this movie merits.

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Roger Ryan
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:04 pm
Location: A Midland town spread and darkened into a city

Re: On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

#28 Post by Roger Ryan » Mon Nov 02, 2020 2:26 pm

I thought the film was okay as a streaming platform rom-com (certainly superior to the deluge of Netlfix entries in this category such as The Kissing Booth), but, yes, a disappointment coming from Coppola. I like how the opening off-screen dialog establishes a possessiveness on Murray's part that is resolved by Jones in the final scene...
SpoilerShow
By replacing the father's watch with the watch given by her husband, she belatedly demonstrates a willingness to extricate herself from her casually domineering father.
... but there's hardly anything in between those two moments that develops that conflict. Murray is asked to deliver some pretty wretched lines, but his performance is the only thing generating any energy.

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domino harvey
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Re: On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

#29 Post by domino harvey » Mon Nov 02, 2020 2:55 pm

The whole film is about avoiding any actual conflict in the worst, freshman creative writing way. Take the lousiest scene in the film, where Murray gets pulled over by the cop. It might have been funny to have him bluff his way out of a ticket, but that he actually knows the guy's dad, which is an unlikely coincidence even in the logic of this character as presented, perfectly embodies the contrived refusal to engage in any dramatic stakes. Murray might get punished but instead he prevails in the most asinine, Mary Sue way possible. I don't think the film ends up critical of him at all. Indeed, it like Jones seems to indulge him to the end. But really the worst character (and that's being generous to label him as such) here is easily Marlon Wayans' bland nothing of a wandering husband, whose "confrontation" in the finale is laughable on its own but kinda pathetic when one buys into the readings of the film that identify Jones' character as Coppola
SpoilerShow
"Actually I love you so much that I don't feel worthy of you!" A response not reflected in the actions or behaviors or outward characteristics of either character for the entire film. Did Sofia Coppola really write in a character who treats her stand-in like Homer wanted Poochie treated? Vom

felipe
Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 11:06 pm

Re: On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

#30 Post by felipe » Mon Nov 02, 2020 4:41 pm

The cop scene was further troubling for me because the film is has a biracial protagonist (even though race is never mentioned anywhere in it) and there is a scene in which her white father simply gets away for being white but nothing comes out of that situation, and we are lead to believe Jones's character doesn't see anything wrong with that, doesn't - even for a split second, imagine her husband or daughters in the same situation.

beamish14
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 3:07 pm

Re: On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

#31 Post by beamish14 » Mon Nov 02, 2020 4:54 pm

domino harvey wrote:
Mon Nov 02, 2020 2:55 pm
The whole film is about avoiding any actual conflict in the worst, freshman creative writing way. Take the lousiest scene in the film, where Murray gets pulled over by the cop. It might have been funny to have him bluff his way out of a ticket, but that he actually knows the guy's dad, which is an unlikely coincidence even in the logic of this character as presented, perfectly embodies the contrived refusal to engage in any dramatic stakes. Murray might get punished but instead he prevails in the most asinine, Mary Sue way possible. I don't think the film ends up critical of him at all. Indeed, it like Jones seems to indulge him to the end. But really the worst character (and that's being generous to label him as such) here is easily Marlon Wayans' bland nothing of a wandering husband, whose "confrontation" in the finale is laughable on its own but kinda pathetic when one buys into the readings of the film that identify Jones' character as Coppola
SpoilerShow
"Actually I love you so much that I don't feel worthy of you!" A response not reflected in the actions or behaviors or outward characteristics of either character for the entire film. Did Sofia Coppola really write in a character who treats her stand-in like Homer wanted Poochie treated? Vom

Don't you know? Art gallery owners are always friends with uniform cops!

This film is so bad it almost made me wish I was rewatching her mother's film Paris Can Wait instead. Every element is wretched, from
Phoenix's forgettable music to the aforementioned amateurish dialogue to the total lack of propulsion to carry the story from beginning to end.

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Toland's Mitchell
Joined: Sun Nov 10, 2019 2:42 pm

Re: On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

#32 Post by Toland's Mitchell » Mon Nov 09, 2020 3:43 pm

I wouldn't say On the Rocks was terrible, although that police scene certainly was. As already mentioned, that scene was dreadfully unfunny due to its serious logistical and tonal issues, single-handedly bringing the film down a notch or two. Outside of that scene, it was a hit-or-miss comedy. Nevertheless, On the Rocks is a stain on Coppola's filmography, who (along with Murray) would be a primary reason anybody would watch it to begin with.

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Pavel
Joined: Fri Aug 07, 2020 2:41 pm

Re: On the Rocks (Sofia Coppola, 2020)

#33 Post by Pavel » Mon Nov 09, 2020 6:20 pm

The police scene is def the laziest scene in the movie (and it perfectly illustrates most of the film's weaknesses in a couple of minutes) but I wouldn't say it's much different than anything else. Nothing in the film is even remotely amusing or charming, it's just a bland, gossamer-thin excuse for a movie. Bill Murray's fun to watch, but the script is about as funny as cholera.

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