MyFrenchFilmFestival

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#51 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Feb 07, 2020 3:55 pm

I was about the give the English titles but domino beat me to it. Those are indeed what I'd recommend. Definitely The Bare Necessity but after that it depends what you're in the mood for. Knowing your tastes a bit I'd still recommend the war one I mentioned though it's a grab bag, but you may also get more out of School's Out than I did, or hate the movie depending on your perception of what it's saying about generational diagnostics. I think you'd feel similarly to me maybe even more frustrated with it, but I really don't know. I am curious to hear your (and domino's) thoughts on that one though, considering the thin strand of thread of interacting with youth we share.

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#52 Post by knives » Fri Feb 07, 2020 4:02 pm

That does sound very interesting. Thanks.

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#53 Post by knives » Sun Feb 09, 2020 7:34 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:28 pm
L'Heure de la sortie: Another eerie setup that doesn’t pay off but the unsettling vibe especially signifying generational divide is effective if also questionably problematic for the reasons Colin and I got into in the horror thread re: Them. This film more clearly exposes a very real terror in not being able to comprehend a separate cohort of people which is frightening because we are all collectively human so that separatism cracks apart the idea of Lockeian good essence in favor of something itching towards the foundational antisocial drives of Hobbes, but also alienates and dehumanizes the gen z crowd all the same, or at least paints them to be culturally inclined to sociopathic activities and cynicism. This is like if First Reformed took its ideas and diluted them into a simple surface-level misreading, and then threw that nihilistic view onto our youth. Taking adults’ anxiety and placing it onto others is a bit condescending and avoidant of the real content to unwrap here, and is thus disrespectful to all generations as well as the viewer.
Of the previously recommended titles this was the one that sounded most interesting to me, but it's pretty bad in a way that cracked me up pretty hard. The film definitely doesn't take place on earth which is fine, but how it chooses to be silly entertainment isn't successful. The plot is literally beat for beat taken from an old episode of CSI, but told in a very French sort of way to give a sense of where we're at.

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#54 Post by therewillbeblus » Sun Feb 09, 2020 7:38 pm

Yeah I figured you wouldn’t like it, though I don’t think anyone has actually recommended this movie so much as I posed a YMMV linkage to teaching this generation, though that mileage I feel is destined to range from a shrug to disdain, but maybe someone will surprise me and enjoy it

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#55 Post by knives » Sun Feb 09, 2020 7:45 pm

I should clarify that I went in assuming it was going to be something like The Class, but instead got a television ready The Skulls with kids instead. I honestly would have much preferred a film about him trying to nail his fellow teacher instead. Those scenes were much more interesting than anything to do with the kids.

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#56 Post by therewillbeblus » Sun Feb 09, 2020 7:55 pm

Yeah I just thought the implications of the kids, their outlooks, and mannerisms were pejorative and troublesome though it was so silly that I just didn’t care enough to be frustrated with it, which would have at least made it more interesting.

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#57 Post by knives » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:08 pm

I agree. I was actually laughing a bit throughout the experience because of how silly the whole thing is. Just go to the police with the videos and explain what you saw, man.

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#58 Post by therewillbeblus » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:19 pm

Forgive me if this is obvious, but I stopped caring while watching enough to figure out
SpoilerShow
what happened to the original teacher? Was it a red herring to believe the kids psychologically pushed him to kill him self, or was their bleak worldview or some other circumstance the trigger? Not that it really matters..

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#59 Post by knives » Sun Feb 09, 2020 8:20 pm

Not that it really matters is basically my point of view.

One thing that did frustrate me though is
SpoilerShow
that a film like this has no right showing the actual death of a real person. That's just gross.

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#60 Post by therewillbeblus » Tue Feb 11, 2020 3:51 pm

I received an email from MyFrenchFilmFestival today to remind me that we can cast votes for films too which will get an Audience Award. Maybe I'm blind, but can anybody figure out how to do this on the site?

Also, looking back on past recipients I'm shocked to see that Caprice came up empty handed its year, not even getting an Audience Award. I'm not holding my breath for Perdrix, though it's hard to think of what will win.. probably Les Confins du monde

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senseabove
Joined: Wed Dec 02, 2015 3:07 am

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#61 Post by senseabove » Wed Feb 12, 2020 1:57 am

Perdrix/The Bare Necessity: Sorry to say this was a total misfire for me... If there are occasional moments that approach some complexity about how we find, form, need, and shed relationships, they're tucked in those scenes that don't adhere to the dominant style of Andersonian geometry, quirky cutesiness, "interactive storybook" framing, musical counterpoint, etc. Unfortunately, that style is very dominant, and runs roughshod over them most of the time. The often jarring contrast between the two styles is clearly intentional—not quite so simplistic as Juliette's persistent unsettledness erupting into Pierrot's orderly world until they find a happy medium, but that's the gist—but it was a thoroughly insufficient conceit for me; and lacking a style that grabbed me (or at least didn't annoy me), the major narrative beats felt, charmlessly, like exactly what one expects from the moment we've seen the two leads in the same room.

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knives
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#62 Post by knives » Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:45 pm

therewillbeblus wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:18 pm
Image

Perdrix

It was worth working through nearly all of the films in competition to get here. This is the winner. An original inverted anti-romantic comedy that finds comfort in deadpan absurdities of human behavior and draws a facade of eccentric characters, a facade because they’re actually rooted in the flesh of ordinary people. We are allotted a gentle dissection of the manic pixie dream girl’s authentic presentation, and as we watch her as just one of many examples, we realize how all of these common caricatures and even the accompanying silly humor of genre films really hint with distance at human truths. This film levels the playing field and shortens the distance, creating an intimate and vulnerable space to confront such psychological and social rhetorical questions and is content with seeing them as both universal in generalization and special in experience.

The film is ultimately about how people become honest with themselves and with one another through the presence of another human being, and in Erwan Le Duc’s world his characters wear their defense mechanisms and personalities on their sleeves side by side as if they were the same (aren’t they?), putting up barriers while simultaneously shedding them. They put their core beliefs out in the open to be chiseled away at- whether by their own hands or most often others’ - relentlessly, sometimes without even realizing it, and yet the mood of this is so conscientious with warmth it melts the icy aggressiveness and reveals it to be another reactionary part protecting the emotional tissue of the exposed soul. The offbeat characters and desire to connect are there per usual, but the eye into the idiosyncrasies is multidimensional and cuts through the typical cloth to admire humanity in all its beautiful pain, innocent fear, and peculiar joy.

There is a Wes Anderson vibe to some of the comedy/pathos blends, and a good-natured lighthearted optimism with eclectic humor covering stark realities about the limitations of perspective and social dynamics that is reminiscent of Mouret. The boldness of these people and their social environment even recalls a raw and unsculpted Miranda July film of searing emotions with intentionally less control over its humor and surrealism that flies out of the shadows to provoke our senses, just like in real life but with a light twist- not too much to disbar a relationship with the viewer and just enough to bleed more sobriety into the truth of spirit. In this picture characters are people and vice versa, and the film essentially declares that the 'quirky' and the 'real' exist inside of one another, something indie rom-coms have been trying to access for decades with only few succeeding with authenticity. Maybe we are like earthworms, beings of contradictions, comprehensive of opposite yet reciprocal parts, adhering to sensibility and instability. Perhaps we need to be unique in solitude and know ourselves just as much as we need to love another and share ourselves. Maybe 'serenity comes to the self-centered,' as one character positions to make another speechless, prompting a difficult yet brave act that works against socially celebrated choices but is absolutely righteous all the same. I don’t know, but the film is hilarious and alive and touching, has the funniest police station scenes and musical performance in recent memory, demonstrates deftness as it transitions from magical to solemn within so many scenes, is as philosophically dense and emotionally intelligent as it is satirical while never condescending, and so far is the year’s best film. More than anything, it makes one grateful for the adventure that is life and inspires us to believe that we can all be our own unique version of Robinson Crusoe if we take a leap of faith and become honest with ourselves.
More thoughts on this later, but I found this utterly hilarious and wonderful. It reminded me a lot of Dominique Abel's films.

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therewillbeblus
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#63 Post by therewillbeblus » Wed Feb 12, 2020 8:49 pm

I don’t know if I’m happier that you liked it or that I was able to measure your sometimes tough to pin down tastes and recommend it. Looking forward to your thoughts!

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#64 Post by therewillbeblus » Fri Feb 14, 2020 7:01 pm

Last call reminder to see Perdrix (The Bare Necessity) or any of the other festival features for those interested, on amazon prime or the festival site. Not sure if this will go through Sunday or not but it says it ends on the 16th, so if you’ve got space in your weekend I’d recommend prioritizing a few of these since who knows if or when they’ll be available with English subs again

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knives
Joined: Sat Sep 06, 2008 6:49 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#65 Post by knives » Sat Feb 15, 2020 9:22 pm

Speaking of, I've been trying to put into words what works for Perdrix, but I just don't have them. I could see somebody disliking the film, but it just works really well for me.

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therewillbeblus
Joined: Tue Dec 22, 2015 3:40 pm

Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#66 Post by therewillbeblus » Sat Feb 15, 2020 9:49 pm

Yeah- I tried, and I still feel strongly about my initial thoughts- but also sometimes, like taking the act of a Civil War reenactment and transforming the period to WWII, familiar ideas can be reworked to reveal a whole new set of opportunities completely unique within a preexisting skeleton, and not a whole lot needs to be said beyond that respect for imagination and the pleasures of wit, humor, and empathy that come with this one.

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knives
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#67 Post by knives » Sat Feb 15, 2020 10:04 pm

My favorite moment was the line, "I do not reciprocate," which at least is a genius phrasing by the translator. It's also surprising given how silly the film is how its use of pathos is actually effective with that ending bringing up some very complicated emotions. I guess Bringing Up Baby is the best phrase I can use to sum up my feelings about this film.

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therewillbeblus
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#68 Post by therewillbeblus » Sat Feb 15, 2020 10:12 pm

Yeah that line (and many from the brother) are gold, and I think the pathos burns a hole in the stylization and molded genre trappings to reveal a deeper authenticity than you often get. Maud Wyler‘s character, for example, hints at a MPDG type but deconstructs it to undo the one-sidedness and magical nature enough to become as honest as any female character in a romantic comedy I can think of.

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knives
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#69 Post by knives » Sat Feb 15, 2020 10:17 pm

I think she is definitely where the film will live and die for an audience. It's a great and complicated performance that uses her body in a fascinating way. It seems like she has a lazy eye or maybe a Marty Feldman thing which forces her to be the center of the screen. We never really learn much about her and she really does seem to exist for that magic, but contra to the expectation she's very feisty and seems to be primarily angry at the cop. It's a hard knot to untangle though I think the film manages to piece things together in a way that works.

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therewillbeblus
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#70 Post by therewillbeblus » Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:03 pm

Exactly, she absolutely retains that magical nature just three dimensional enough to give space for authenticity and relatability. It’s like she exists as a caricature, a fleshed out character, and an empathetic vessel of our own humanity, which of course has been done before but not in this way and not often in the genre this is sorta working with, even if I’d argue it’s more building on it

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domino harvey
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#71 Post by domino harvey » Sun Feb 16, 2020 12:40 pm

Catching up on the titles that aren’t available on back channels (which I will get to in my own sweet time), in the order I liked them:

Les confins du monde (Guillaume Nicloux)
Elliptical study of one French soldier’s quest to find and kill the local leader responsible for a grisly slaughter that took the lives of his brother and sister-in-law in the Indochina front of WWII. While the pacing and ellipses work well for the story being told, I thought what was shown was simply too familiar, despite attempts to insert shocking graphic moments of brutality (including the sadly unforgettable image of a leech engorged inside one unlucky soldier’s urethra, “helpfully” shown on-screen via prosthesis). Gerard Depardieu is on hand to lend gravitas and star power, but his character makes no sense and seems to be someone’s idea of Sounds Deep, Bro. Good score, though.

Les fauves (Vincent Mariette)
Lily-Rose Depp befriends a mysterious horror novelist who is spending his summer vacation convincing campground denizens that a legendary leopard is stalking the grounds. This is regrettably yet another French movie where a ridiculously beautiful teenager throws herself at a grouchy middle-aged schlub who doesn’t want her— I could maybe buy Depp falling for Laurent Lafitte in another context, but I refuse to believe anyone could fall for him with the greasy long hair longhaul trucker look he sports here. I’m sure the Comédie-Française is rethinking their always being credited policy after his work here… Apart from these elements, the film has some style, but it doesn’t matter because it doesn’t really work in conjunction with this material, and the last twenty minutes are a total disaster, including a series of last minute revelations that no one could possibly care about because I don’t know who watching this thought it was a mystery movie.

Le vent tourne (Bettina Oberli)
Melanie Thierry and Pierre Deladonchamps put on an organic, homegrown, wind-powered revival of Petit paysan and any random handful of infidelity dramas in this embarrassing collection of cliches that dared me to turn it off with every passing dull reiteration of a note already sounded better elsewhere. At one point Deladonchamps, in reference to the wind turbine he and Thierry have installed on their farm and which she has sabotaged in order to entice her lover back to fix it, says something like, “You wouldn’t do that, destroy something we built together,” to give you some idea of this film’s subtlety.

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therewillbeblus
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#72 Post by therewillbeblus » Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:09 pm

Pretty much my thoughts exactly on all three, though Le vent tourne earned points despite the cliches for turning the most obnoxious and banal of film ideas and presentations into an attempt at Malick intimacy sans voiceover which left it open as a reflective tool of emotion rather than only a contrived film, but I won’t argue that this attempt at audience elicitation isn’t littered with eye rolling familiarity and painfully drawn out meaningless scenes. It really wasn’t very good but I got something out of it, even if that something was more personal interest of camera use to poke in certain places rather than anything to do with the story. I absolutely hated Les fauves and I think Les confins du monde is close to being a very good film but still unsure what to make of it honestly, though I think it’ll probably win the prize.

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knives
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#73 Post by knives » Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:19 pm

Still better than Nicloux's last film if just for have 80 minutes less Depardieu nudity.

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domino harvey
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#74 Post by domino harvey » Sun Feb 16, 2020 2:41 pm

Maybe the Gaspard Ulliel nudity was his way of making amends!

Watch the animated feature that none of us can access win the top prize (Worth noting that the other blocked title, Jessica Forever, is now up with subs on back channels)

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domino harvey
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Re: MyFrenchFilmFestival

#75 Post by domino harvey » Sun Feb 16, 2020 4:34 pm

...and just like that, Les hirondelles de Kaboul has popped up on back channels haha

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